Bob Clampett Athlete Profile

Bob Clampett

Bob Clampett
Height: 5-10 Roster Years: 1977-1980 Hometown: Carmel, CA Hall of Fame: 1990

  • 1990 Men's Golf




All-America

  • 1978 NGCA First Team
  • 1979 NGCA First Team
  • 1980 NGCA First Team

1990 Hall of Fame Inductee

Golf's equivalent of the Heisman Trophy is the Fred Haskins Award, and BYU's Bobby Clampett won it twice while competing for the Cougars.

In college golf circles, you name it and Bobby has won it - and often set a course record while doing so. Consequently, it comes as no surprise that he was selected to the Walker Cup Team, the World Cup Team, and the NCAA All-Stars vs. Japan squad. Against the Japanese, the three-time All-American was voted MVP.

His victory in the Eisenhower Cup World Amateur helped him establish his ranking as the number one amateur in the world in 1978-79. That same year USGA-Golf Digest named him U.S. Amateur of the Year. He was also Western Athletic Conference Player of the Year.

The wavy-haired wonder from Carmel, California, was the low amateur in both the U.S. Open and the Masters. At age 17 he was the youngest player to win a major college tournament at BYU. In 31 competitive rounds for the Cougars his stroke average was 71.1.

Bobby turned professional in 1980, a year before his collegiate eligibility was complete. With Clampett, speculated one Bay Area writer, the 1980 Cougars would be "awesome." Without Clampett, the writer said, BYU would be "great." Without him that group of Cougars won the NCAA Championship. Bobby left BYU having won 32 titles.

Personal

  • Native of Carmel, Calif.

Career Highlights

  • Won the Fred Haskins Award twice for the Cougars
  • Selected to the Walker Cup Team, the World Cup Team and the NCAA All-Stars vs. Japan squad
  • Three-time All-American
  • Named the U.S. AMateur of the Year in 78-79
  • Western Athletic Conference Player of the Year 78-79
  • Became the youngest player to win a major college tournament at BYU at the age of 17
  • Left BYU having won 32 titles

Before BYU

  • (1976): Northern California Junior champion
  • (1977): California State Junior champion
  • Won the California Tournament of Champions

After BYU

  • Turned professional in 1980, a year before his collegiate eligibility was complete

Post BYU Honors and Societies

  • Inducted into the BYU Hall of Fame in 1990


1977-1978 | Freshman Year

  • Named first team All-America
  • Named first team All-WAC
  • Was low amateur in U.S. Open
  • Was a semifinalist U.S. Amateur
  • Placed first in the John Burns Rainbow Classic, All-American Intercollegiate, Wester Junior, Western Amateur, California State Amateur, Porter Cup, World Amateur and William H. Tucker Intercollegiate
  • Was voted most valuable player in the NCAA All-Stars versus Japan All-Stars

1978-1979 | Sophomore Year

  • Named Outstanding Collegiate Player for the NCAA
  • Named first team All-America
  • Finished second at the NCAA Championships
  • Won four collegiate tournaments
  • Finished second at the Sun Bowl