Utah State Pre-Game Fireside

Oct 02, 2009 - Posted by Carey Hoki on October 2, 2009 at 12:17 pm | Updated: May 2, 2011 3:35 pm

Quarterback Riley Nelson and defensive lineman Jan Jorgensen were the two players who spoke at last night's fireside at the Provo Tabernacle.

Nelson, a transfer from Utah State, centered his talk around the principle of persistence. He shared an experience from when he returned from his mission earlier this year. While playing around with his brother and younger players from Logan High School, Nelson realized that being away from the game of football for two years definitely took its toll. Frustrated, he questioned whether or not he'd made the right decision to serve a mission and return to play at a Division I program. A quote by President Heber J. Grant helped him wade through his frustrations.

"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do—not that the nature of the thing has changed, but that our power to do has increased.”

Nelson went on sharing other examples of times in his life he felt overwhelmed, including learning to play the piano and preparing for the ACTs in high school.

"Sometimes it feels like we've done all we can," he added. "If we call on our Heavenly Father, he will send help, whether it be through another person, a song or a feeling from the Spirit."

He closed by bearing his testimony and stating his love for the Savior.

"Every person owes our Savior for his persistence," said Nelson. "We should try in every way to be like him and emulate his servants who we have the privilege of hearing from this weekend during General Conference."

Jorgensen followed with a talk on humility. He began by addressing the antithesis of humility--pride. The following is a quote from C.S. Lewis:

"Pride gets no pleasure out of having something, only out of having more of it than the next man. We say that people are proud of being rich, or clever, or good-looking, but they are not. They are proud of being richer, or cleverer, or better-looking than others. If everyone else became equally rich, or clever, or good-looking there would be nothing to be proud about. It is the comparison that makes you proud: the pleasure of being above the rest. Once the element of competition has gone, pride has gone."

Turning to humility, Jorgensen quoted Elder Neal A. Maxwell when he said, "The submission of one's will is really the only uniquely personal thing we have to place on God's altar. The many other things we 'give' are actually the things He has already given or loaned to us."

Jorgensen then addressed two ways our humility is tested: hardships and success.

"Often times we don't think of successes as a test," he said. "But who do we attribute our successes to? We should say, 'The Lord, not me.'"