Football Firesides

Fireside - TCU

Oct 27, 2011 - Posted by Jordan Christiansen at 10:20 pm | Permalink

The team held its usual pregame fireside at the Colleyville Stake Center in Texas on Friday evening.

Seniors McKay Jacobson and Moose Thorson spoke along with usual speakers Bronco and Holly Mendenhall.

Jacobson based his thoughts around a favorite scripture he often recited on his mission to Japan. In D&C 4:2, Jacobson was inspired to do all he was asked to do with his "heart, might, mind and strength." Whether it was learning Japanese, teaching those interested in his message or football upon his return, Jacobson expressed his testimony that following that verse of scripture has improved his life.

According to the senior receiver, President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Second Counselor in the First Presidency, recently came to a team meeting. Among other things, Jacobson said that President Uchtdorf told the team that God does not necessarily care whether they win or lose - but he does care how hard they try. The same principle holds true in all we do, from sports to all other aspects of life.

After a musical number by kicker Brian Smith, Thorson, an offensive lineman on the team, spoke of his journey from being a walk-on to a scholarship player who recently earned the first start of his career this season.

Thorson bore testimony that through the gospel, a person can do anything, giving himself as an example of a player with less skill who has been blessed by God to do things above his abilities.

After Coach Mendenhall's wife, Holly, reminded the congregation that they were all examples to people both known and unknown, Coach Mendenhall closed the meeting with his remarks. He told the story of being given the assignment by his father to break in new colts. Coach tied each colt to a mule; as the mules would being walking forward, the colts would dig in their heels, fall on the ground and resist being taken anywhere.

But with the mules plodding along despite the chaos behind them, the colts would learn to go along, eventually becoming more docile. Mendenhall compared the mules to himself, his family and all others who attempt to do good while the world around them fights and resists the standards of the gospel.

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