Lindsey Metcalf: A Dual Sport Wonder

BYU High Jumper Lindsey Metcalf has learned to defy the odds as a dual-sport athlete to become a track All-American.

For high jumper Lindsey Metcalf a typical day doesn't just include practice for one sport, but for two. This dual sport wonder for four months out of the year hits two practices a day, day-in and day-out as a member of both the BYU women's track and field team and the women's volleyball team.

"Really I love both sports," Metcalf said. "I love the team unity of volleyball because really we are all very good friends and I love the individual success you can have on the track team. Track really is a sport where I do well because of me and I do badly because of me."

Coming out of high school Metcalf had no idea that athletes were even allowed to do two sports at a time.

"I really didn't think it was possible," Metcalf said. "I thought I had to choose and so I did. I chose volleyball because it is more fun, but after a year of not doing it I just had to take it up again."

After talking to the BYU women's head coach, Craig Poole, Metcalf convinced him he needed to let her walk-on to the team.

"He has been pretty happy ever since then," Metcalf said in reference to her performances.

Truly, the coaches really should be happy though, because Metcalf's dual-sport participation only enhances her performance in each sport.

"Volleyball helps prepare me for track because I jump way more in volleyball than in track," Metcalf said. "And track only helps get me really in shape for volleyball."

Ultimately, Metcalf says the coaches have been very considerate and willing to work with her.

"Overall, the experience has been a wonderful one," Metcalf said. "I always want to give 100% to both sports and the coaches both expect that of me so sometimes it can become a little hard amidst the fun."

This is an inner conflict Metcalf knows well. Once Metcalf became a dual-sport athlete she found out just how hard it really is doubling the commitments.

"With two sports I get really really tired," Metcalf said. "My mind just goes crazy because not only am I trying to do two practices a day, and do them well, I have to keep up with school. It means that I don't have much of a social life and I never really get ready for four months out of the year."

But the verdict is in and BYU and Metcalf have decided she is too invaluable to lose to either sport despite the stress it places on her.

"In the end," Metcalf said, "I just get too excited to do both that I just keep on doing both. Ultimately I think it has only enhanced my performance and made me a happier person. For when I can do what I love, I am happy."

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